Turn Up the Volume on Your Company’s Training and Development Efforts

Cash is definitely not king when it comes to winning over millennials in today’s competitive hiring environment. In fact, in one study by PricewaterhouseCoopers, millennials didn’t just rank training and development as their most valued employee benefit, they rated it a whopping 300 per cent higher than cash bonuses!

How can you prove to prospective candidates of any age that training and development is a true priority within your corporate culture? Here are five ideas that will help illustrate your company walks the walk when it comes continuous learning and professional development.

Publish Your Perspectives

A blog on your company website with featured posts about new and emerging trends written by employees is a great way to illustrate to potential candidates that you encourage your team to keep its fingers on the pulse of the industry. Be sure to have the author include a brief biography at the end of the post, so readers realize that your employees have been granted the time to research and write the post.

Online Training and Development through Lynda.com

At the click of a button, you can offer your employees a mobile library of in-depth online training and development courses through dynamic, online instructional videos and self-paced courses. Lynda.com, acquired by LinkedIn in 2015, is a paid online learning platform that offers more than 4,000 courses in business, technology and creative skills taught by industry experts on subjects such as AutoCAD, Application design, web coding and programming, finance, and graphic design. Students earn a certificate of completion and a whole lot of expanded knowledge to take their careers to the next level.

Get Social on the Show Floor

When employees attend an industry event, trade show, or conference, ask them to share key insights from it on social media channels and tag your company. When candidates search your company on social media they will see that you support employees’ professional development by sending them to industry events.

Ramp up Your Reading Material

Does your company’s candidate waiting area pass the magazine test? If there are outdated magazines that rival the selection at your doctor’s office, you’re sending a not-so-subtle message that your organization may not be making it a priority to stay on top of the industry’s latest trends. Even if you tend to get your news online, subscribe to a few hard copy publications that are respected within your industry and keep them front and centre.

Fill Their Minds and Their Stomachs

Continuous learning isn’t just courses and conference. Encourage staff with unique knowledge and experiences to share insights with their peers at informal lunch and learn programs, or bring in outside experts so everyone can learn something new. During the interview process, ensure candidates know that you do this by bringing it up in a question like, “We have a program where employees are encouraged to share unique perspectives and skills with their peers at a monthly team lunch. Are there any specific topics that you would want to share with your co-workers, or any topics you’d like to learn more about?”

Know Your Numbers

Does your human resources department track employee training hours and costs? Keep those numbers handy during interviews, especially if they tell a story that you’re proud to share. According to the Association for Talent Development’s 2016 State of the Industry Report, organizations spent an average of $1,252 per employee on training and development initiatives in 2015, and employees averaged 33.5 hours of training.

 

Are you wondering if your company’s training and development programs will be viewed as a valuable perk by potential candidates? Talk to one of our Hiring Consultants to see how what you’re doing compares to other companies in your space.

If you’d like some additional insight into how to win over today’s top talent during the recruitment process, download our Insider’s Guide to Technical Talent.

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Emily Schmidt

Emily Schmidt

Emily is the Contractor and Financial Operations Manager at Ian Martin. Her goal is to build teams that provide a world-class customer experience. When not analysing financial processes, ensuring a thousand people are paid or helping onboard hundreds of contractors, she can be found building tables out of wood. She hopes to graduate to chairs in the future.
Emily Schmidt